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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

3 edition of Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, 1988-1992 found in the catalog.

Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, 1988-1992

Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, 1988-1992

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health in [Bethesda, MD] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cancer -- United States -- Statistics,
  • Cancer -- United States -- Mortality -- Statistics,
  • Ethnic groups -- Diseases -- United States -- Statistics,
  • Minorities -- Diseases -- United States -- Statistics,
  • United States -- Statistics, Medical

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesRacial, ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, 1988-1992
    Statement[editor-in-chief, Barry A. Miller ; contributing editors, Laurence N. Kolonel ... et al.] ; additional editors, Linda Coyle ... [et al.]]
    SeriesSEER monograph, NIH publication -- 98-4104, NIH publication -- no. 98-4104
    ContributionsMiller, Barry A, Kolonel, Laurence N, Coyle, Linda, National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[1], iii, 129, 9 p. :
    Number of Pages129
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14482203M
    OCLC/WorldCa39342183

    Source: Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States , NCI TEN MYTHS ABOUT BREAST CANCER. from Dr. Susan Love's Breast Book. Having fibrocystic disease increases your risk of breast cancer.* Coffee increases your risk of breast cancer. Only women with a family history of breast cancer are at risk. The Role of Mass Surveys in the Detection of Cancer. RG 29, le C NationalCancer Institute(U.S.) Miller, B.A., et al., eds. Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States , National Cancer Institute. NIH Pub. No. Bethesda, MD, National Cancer Institute. El Papanicolaou: I Un Habíto Saludable, ParaToda LaVida!Cited by: 4.

    Apr 01,  · Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, Bethesda: National Institutes of Health; Hiatt RA, Pasick RJ, Pérez-Stable EJ, et al. Pathways to early cancer detection in the multiethnic population of the San Francisco Bay consumersnewhomeconstruction.com by: Apr 30,  · Next article in issue: Race/ethnic variations in ovarian cancer mortality in the United States, (SEER) program for the years – For example, Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States NIH Pub. No.

    Journal of Environmental and Public Health / Analyzing socioeconomic and racial/ethnic patterns in cancer mortality and incidence is important because it allows us to quantify cancer-related health Weighted correlations between area socioeconomic index and county-level age-adjusted cancer mortality rates, United States, –Cited by: Integrating economic analysis into cancer clinical trials the National Cancer Institute-American Society of Clinical Oncology economics workbook Title Integrating economic analysis into cancer clinical trials [microform]: the National Cancer Institute-American Society of Clinical Oncology economics workbook / writing committee, Martin Brown.


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Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, 1988-1992 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, [Barry A Miller; Laurence N Kolonel; National Cancer Institute (U.S.). Cancer Control Research Program.;]. Home Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States, The information on this page is archived and provided for reference purposes only.

Please go to the Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States homepage to access current information. Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States, Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, [Washington, D.C.]: U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Health, (OCoLC) United States population. The cancers included in this report are organized alphabetically. They are followed by a section on cancer control efforts in special population groups and an appendix.

The appendix contains tables showing the number of newly diagnosed cancers, by racial/ethnic group, in specific regions of the United States during. Seer Monograph: Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States [Barry A. Miller] on consumersnewhomeconstruction.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying consumersnewhomeconstruction.com: Barry A.

Miller. The appendix contains tables showing the number of newly diagnosed cancers, by racial/ethnic group, in specific regions of the USA during It also includes estimates for the entire country of the number of newly diagnosed cancers and the number of cancer deaths in Cited by: Racial/Ethnic Variations in Women's Health: The Social Embeddedness of Health This article provides an overview of the magnitude of and trends in racial/ethnic disparities in health for women in the United States.

Kolonel LN, Bernstein L, et al. Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States, –Bethesda, Md: National Cited by: 1. Author(s): Miller,Barry A; Kolonel,Laurence N; National Cancer Institute (U.S.).

Cancer Control Sciences Program. Title(s): Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, / editor-in-chief, Barry A. Miller ; contributing editors, Laurence N. Kolonel. Health disparities. Asian Americans are a heterogeneous group.

The racial class is composed of many different ethnicities and cultures. In addition to country of origin, individuals can differ in socioeconomic status, education level, immigration status, level of acculturation, and English proficiency.

In general, ethnic groups have their own health disparities. African American women have the highest mortality rate for breast cancer among these same groups (31 per ,), while Chinese women have the lowest at 11 perSource: Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United StatesNCI.

Aug 18,  · The state, which has a good representation of black and Hispanic people, participated in the just-published SEER monograph on ''Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States ''.

Miller B, Kolonel L, Bernstein L, et al. (eds.) () Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States – National Institutes of Health Publication No. 96– Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Google ScholarCited by: Recent Trends in Mortality Rates for Four Major Cancers, by Sex and Race/Ethnicity United States, In53% of all cancer-related deaths in the United States were associated with four sites: lung/bronchus, colon/rectum, prostate, and female breast (1).Cancer-related death does not affect racial/ethnic populations similarly.

Racial/ethnic patterns in lifetime and age-conditional risk estimates for selected cancers. Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States. % of people experiencing gastritis incur costs for inexpensive over-the-counter medication, but that only 10% incur costs for a limited visit to a physician.

It was assumed that 5% of patients with gastritis visit a specialist. For recurrent disease, it was assumed that costs incurred include 1. Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer provides trends in cancer incidence and death rates in the United States for all races/ethnicities combined and among 5 major racial/ethnic groups (white, black, Asian and Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaska Natives, and Hispanic).

Table A14–3 summarizes the health care costs incurred by melanoma. For the purposes of the calculations in this report, it was assumed that local disease is associated with costs for outpatient surgery, four specialist physician visits per year for 2 years and.

Mar 08,  · After presenting terms and theoretical perspectives, we review current literature and explore national data to describe patterns of physical and mental health among Asian ethnic groups.

Finally, we conclude the chapter with recommendations for future directions on ethnicity and health among Asian consumersnewhomeconstruction.com by: 1. Sources of Data. The information on cancer incidence and mortality in this report is from the SEER publication Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States – 2 Information on incidence is tabulated for 11 racial and ethnic groups (African American, Alaska Native, American Indian from New Mexico, Chinese, Filipino, Hawaiian, Hispanic, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and white).Cited by: There has been interest in the issues raised by cancer statistics reported by race and ethnicity, particularly the perception that African-American males were dying more frequently than white males.

A SEER program publication entitled Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States –, 31 has been analyzed by Parker and associates, 32 and the following conclusions were made (Fig. Sep 21,  · The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MBCCOP) seeks to enhance minority participation in cancer clinical trials by building clinical trials outreach and management capacity in healthcare Cited by: The Role of ERCP in Diagnosing Pancreatic Masses.

Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States Bethesda: National Cancer Institute Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in.the leading cause of death in the United States, cancer is the leading cause of death in the API community with infectious diseases disproportionately triggering higher rates of cancer among APIs, specifically: (1) Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and liver cancer; (2) Human Papilloma virus.